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  • I decided to spruce up (rebuild totally) my personal website a bit - so I'm going to do the writeups of project updates and so on there in future. Will still post on here when i hit milestones on the project though :)

    https://niwarren.co.uk/mg-tf-ev-conversion/

    In the meantime, here's a few pictures of the car in its current state. I've started removing components now - Fuel tank's out and I'm starting to size up the rear battery pack, and the front battery box is getting closer to completion too (requires some modifications but it'll fit eventually :)
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  • Immo1282 replied to the topic EV in a Box in EV Conversions
    Swindon's crate motors do look quite interesting. Pretty expensive compared to some DIY options - £6400 ex VAT is around what my conversion will cost in total, let alone just the powertrain parts, but it'll be lighter and you'd get some OEM support which is probably a value-add for many folks...

    One advantage of that by the looks is compactness. We're lucky that our cars have loads of room where the engine was - if you were converting something old and tiny then it'll probably be pretty great.

    Performance is not particularly special - 80kW is quite a lot less than something like a repurposed drivetrain from a Nissan Leaf.
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  • Logged into Facebook, all I get is an error showing as "content isn't avaliable" for me too.
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  • Got my front battery box back from the welder this morning. The guy even drilled & tapped holes for me which is lovely, because two holes ate 6 drillbits and snapped a tap last time I tried cutting this material (304 stainless steel)

    Fits my front battery pack wonderfully...


    Unfortunately, it fits the car (unmodified) slightly less well...


    This is the idea - though I need to cut into the spare wheel well to get it to drop low enough to close the bonnet lid on it...


    Will definitely have to fabricate some support bars to take some weight off the wheel-well and put it straight onto the subframe, so there's some modifications needed anyway - but I'll have to get the angle grinder out a little earlier than I'd hoped...

    Also played around with my charging port - Turns out the cheap-looking plastic dust-cap that came with my charging port fits pretty well into the metal surround for the fuel-filler. One quick 3D printed part to hold it together and it looks great. The rest of the filler cap has been reinstalled on the car - it seals fine without the metal ring :) Will repaint the ring as it got badly scuffed when I was taking it apart, but other than that it's in good shape (apart from the metal I removed to fit the charge port cover.
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  • I do now (not in my MG, in my other car - I don't really care at this point as its cooling system is all getting ripped out next year anyway with the engine) but didn't when I lived in a very soft-water area.
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  • Looks great TC - I'll probably follow your lead on this while my car's laid up. I'd have it on the road, but money's tight and it needs sill welding, four new tyres and exhaust repair before it'll pass an MOT again, so it's laid up for now. (also there's nowhere to drive it, coronavirus etc.)

    Out of interest - why did you electrify the vacuum on your car? With plans to keep the engine intact, you've got a source of vacuum available w/o the pump.
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  • Talkingcars' idea is cool in theory and I'd love to see it realised. Budgets & space constraints are a thing that's going to be highly apparent in the F/TF when you leave the engine & all require pieces in place...
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  • I've yet to recieve it in the post - it's currently stuck in a Chinese customs warehouse, but I have ordered an on-board charger manufactured by ElCon - a 6.6kW CAN controlled model, that I intend to pair with an Orion BMS2 unit.
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  • Immo1282 created a new forum post in EV Conversions
    On-Board Charging (AC):
    Pretty much all EVs around have on-board battery chargers. This is important because that way, you can plug in anywhere there is mains electricity. It might however take 18 or 20 hours to fully charge up on a standard outlet, so higher power solutions are also common. An on-board charger is the best way to routinely charge an EVs battery, as the charger can be controlled closely by the car's battery management system, and it puts the least stress on the battery (charging generates heat in the battery - charging at excessively high rates can damage cells).

    Onboard chargers typically follow the SAE-J1772 electrical standard and use the IEC 62196 standard "Type 2 (Mennekes)" connector. Many BMS units have the capability to provide control signals for J1772, and using the Type 2 inlet on the car is the best for compatibility with public charging infrastructure (in the EU, it is regulated that all public AC chargers use the Type 2 connector and follow J1772 signalling standards). It is possible to use other connectors for on-board chargers, but that will necessitate carrying a set of plug & socket adaptors if one wishes to use public EV chargers.

    Charging rates for On-board AC charging depend on the power rating of the charger that you pick. If you want to charge at a rate higher than 3kW (13A in the 230VAC world), you will need a specific outlet installed in your charging location (or use a public charger). If you are unfortunate to live in a part of the world that has 110/120V mains voltage, you will probably want a 230/240V circuit installed where you normally charge. The best on-board chargers will have communication features built in - which paired with an appropriate BMS, will allow the BMS to limit charge current and protect against over-voltage etc.

    DC Charging:
    DC Charging enables faster charge rates by moving the charger (AC-to-DC) out of the car, allowing for large high-power kerbside units to supply the HVDC power that the battery needs directly. The car is required to communicate with DC chargers as the car must tell the charger exactly what voltage and current it needs to prevent damage.

    There are two major (non-Tesla) standards for DC charging at present; CHAdeMO and CCS.
    • CHAdeMO, as seen on the Nissan Leaf is a fairly simple standard to interface with. Many BMS units have built-in support for Chademo, and therefore implementation is as "simple" as finding an inlet socket and installing it as guided in the BMS manual.
    • CCS, although it is more common globally is much harder to interface with from a DIY perspective (as of the time of writing 05/2020, there are no off-the-shelf CCS compatible DIY solutions avaliable.)

    High-voltage DC safety must be carefully considered when working out how to integrate DC fast/rapid charging standards, as well as considerations for battery cooling and current capacity of cables etc.
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